EPP Group wants to make the fight against cancer a top EU priority

The fight against cancer is a field where European cooperation, pooling of data and resources can make a real difference in the lives of millions of Europeans. While nearly 200 million Europeans will suffer from cancer in their lifetime, the EPP Group considers that the European Union should make the fight against cancer a top priority in the upcoming five years. This is why the EPP Group will propose the creation of a special committee specifically dedicated to the fight against cancer.

Today, MEPs Manfred Weber and Ewa Kopacz will take the floor during the debate in plenary on the topic.

“I've been around Europe a lot over the past few months and I have asked the question over and over again: why don't we as Europeans pool our research funds, all our knowledge, our databases? And the answer from tens of thousands of Europeans was clear: yes, Europe could do it! In the fight against cancer, we can show a policy that is right, but also a Europe that works to the concrete benefit of the people. Politics can never guarantee scientific progress. But we can guarantee that we will work hard on it. Let us make the master plan against cancer our priority”, Manfred Weber said.

For Ewa Kopacz: "Cooperation amongst Member States is crucial. No country will defeat cancer alone. We want cooperation at EU level by promoting pioneering methods of treating cancer, such as machine learning through artificial intelligence. This is the way to improve patient care and beat cancer."

Earlier this spring, Manfred Weber presented, together with over 15 leading cancer researchers from all over Europe, a masterplan on how Europe can fight cancer more effectively.

For the EPP Group Chairman, Europe can have a massive impact in the fight against cancer, and here is how:

  • a common cancer prevention strategy could prevent 40 per cent of all cancer cases;
  • we must merge all our existing national cancer databases by creating a European Digital Data Centre;
  • through a common early detection strategy, we can increase the chances of survival for thousands of patients;
  • in Eastern Europe, cancer patients today have 30 percent fewer chance of recovery than in Western European countries. Let us work together in partnership and in telemedicine to help every cancer patient, no matter where he or she lives in Europe;
  • patients and their carer relatives often feel left alone. They often lack support and sufficient information. In a cancer patient initiative, let us ensure that cancer patients get the help they need during their illness, but also after their recovery.